The Guide To Doing Good

The 2012 United Way Loaned Executives are (from left to right): Sam Miller (State Farm Insurance), Charlene Aldrich (Shelter Insurance), Pam Forbes (Schneider Electric), Jennifer Bailey (Commerce Bank), Angie Gentry (Boone County National Bank), Melanie Wood (Columbia Insurance Group), John Louie (State Farm Insurance) and Joe Ritter (Landmark Bank)

‘Tis the season for giving, and Columbia has several dozen charities accomplishing good things in a rich variety of ways. The following listings will help you find charities with impacts that match your interests. And who knows? You might even find new passions to carry you into a more meaningful New Year.

Is your favorite charity missing from the list? Send the information to our editor, Sandy Selby, and we’ll add it to our online listings.

 

 

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Missouri
800 N. Providence Road, Suite 101
Columbia, MO 65203
573-874-3677, ext. 201
www.bigsofcentralmo.org
Founded: 1968
Who’s in charge? Executive Director Georgalu Swoboda has more than 35 years of program and management in local and national nonprofits and has 14 years with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Missouri.
What population is served and how? The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported, one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. The community-based program matches children of single parents, children of prisoners and children in long-term foster care with adult volunteer mentors, or “Bigs,” who pick up their “Littles” for activities in the community. The School-Based program matches children recommended by school staff with mentors for weekly educational activities at school. In both programs, the activities allow Bigs to become their Littles’ friends, advisers and role models.
Why does Columbia need this organization? The juvenile referral rate of 10-  to 17-year-olds is 88.9 percent in Boone County, versus 55.2 percent for Missouri. “If a young person is involved in risky behaviors, they are more likely to enter, then re-enter, the juvenile justice system or the adult justice system,” Swoboda says. “As such, it becomes important to work to alter the life trajectories of those juveniles to not only stop the first incidence or reduce further criminal behavior but to improve their chances to prosper as productive citizens.”
What is Big Brothers Big Sisters’ impact? The Public Private Ventures study compared 11-year-old Littles to 11-year-olds in similar demographic situations but without a Big. The Littles were 46 percent less likely to start using illegal drugs, 27 percent less likely to start drinking alcohol, and 33 percent less likely to use violence as a way of solving problems. In 2012, 700 children were mentored in central Missouri.
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $459,317
Total Expenses: $493,889
Total Revenue: $493,889
Program expenses are 93 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
April: Bowl for Kids’ Sake, Big Brothers Big Sisters’ signature fundraiser
August: Countdown to Kickoff, an annual auction held a week before Mizzou football season and hosted by Coach Gary Pinkel
Opportunities to Give:
Note: Missouri Youth Opportunity 50 percent tax credits are available for contributions to this organization.
Go to www.bigsofcentralmo.org and click “Donate” to make a donation online.
Sponsor a Big/Little Match. Contact Georgalu Swoboda at 573-874-3677, ext. 201.
Mail a financial donation or theater/sports tickets for Big/Little matches to above address.
Form a team for Bowl for Kids Sake in April. Contact Kerrie at Kerrie@bigsofcentralmo.org.


The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri
2101 Vandiver Drive
Columbia, MO 65202
573-474-1020
www.sharefoodbringhope.org
Founded: 1981
Who’s in charge? Executive Director Peggy Kirkpatrick has led the organization for 20 years.
What population is served and how? The food bank brings together community resources to feed people in need through a network of 135 partner agencies, which include pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, senior programs and children’s programs. The food bank also runs the Buddy Pack program, which provides food to children in need over weekends and other breaks from school.
Why does Columbia need this organization? One in six people in the food bank’s service is food insecure. “That means those individuals do not know where their next meal will come from,” says Rachel Ellersieck, communications coordinator.
What is The food bank’s impact? The food bank provides food to 100,000 people through its agencies in 32 counties, from the northeast corner of the state all the way down to the Lake of the Ozarks region. Its Buddy Pack program helps 6,700 students each week. “We distribute close to 30 million pounds of food annually,” Ellersieck says. “This is about 22.5 million meals each year.”
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $45,612,862
Total Expenses: $46,496,291
Total Revenue: $52,492,236
Program expenses are 98 percent of total expenses. Note: In-kind and food donations account for the majority of these figures.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
Jan. 18–27, 2013: Mid-Missouri Restaurant Week; participating restaurants will give 3 percent of their food sales to the Buddy Pack program (www.midmissourirestaurantweek.com)
Feb. 23, 2013: Table Scraps, a scrapbooking retreat to benefit Buddy Packs (www.sharefoodbringhope.org/news/event/tablescraps/)
April 20, 2013: Float Your Boat for The food bank; teams race cardboard boxes (www.floatforthefoodbank.org)
May 11, 2013: Stamp Out Hunger: Letter Carrier Food Drive
Opportunities to Give:
The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri is seeking to raise enough food and funds between Nov. 1 and Dec. 31 to provide 15 million meals for hungry Missourians. With every $1, the food bank can acquire 15 pounds of food or enough for 11 meals. Donate — or start a virtual food drive —online at www.sharefoodbringhope.org/foodfortheholidays. Another way to help is the “Adopt a Buddy” program — a $180 donation covers the cost of providing one Buddy Pack for one student for an entire school year.


Heart of Missouri United Way Inc.
11700 East Pointe Drive, Suite 201
Columbia, MO 65201
573-443-4523
www.uwheartmo.org
Founded: 1947
Who’s in charge? Executive Director Tim Rich has 30 years in public service and 28 years in Columbia, mostly in poverty-focused nonprofit services.
What population is served and how? The Heart of Missouri United Way works to improve lives of people in need by mobilizing and coordinating the caring power of community resources in mid-Missouri. In 2013, the organization will focus its financial support and strategies to make a measurable impact on at-risk youth and families through its Community Impact service model.
Why does Columbia need this organization? “Our poverty rate has more than doubled since 1984, unemployment has increased by more than 70 percent since 2006, 200 Boone County residents are homeless, 150 students will drop out of high school this year, 7,000 people go hungry each day, and 43 percent of public school kids are living in poverty (up 10 percent in the last five years),” Rich says. “We must turn back the tide and lift people out of poverty to save our own future.”
What is Heart of Missouri United Way’s impact? With its new approach, the organization is taking responsibility not only for raising funds for local nonprofits but also for producing a measurable return on donors’ investments. “Together, in this new collaborative approach, we will work as a community to change the underlying conditions in our community and in people’s lives that create and sustain poverty among our fellow Columbians,” Rich says. Heart of Missouri United Way will provide $3.2 million for 35 Community Impact strategies proposed by 26 local organizations in 2013.
Financial Information:
Program Expenses:      $4,385,135
Total Expenses:           $4,875,882 (includes Joplin Tornado Relief)
Total Revenue:            $5,453,609 (includes Joplin Tornado Relief)
Program expenses are 90 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
March 2013: Community Awards Breakfast/Annual Meeting
May 2013: Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Mother’s Day Brunch
July 2013: Bridges Out of Poverty Training
August 2013: Community Campaign Launch
Year-round: Ongoing Nonprofit Capacity Building Trainings. Visit www.uwheartmo.org for up-to-date information.
Year-round: Volunteer opportunities at www.uwheartmo.org/volunteer-opportunities
Opportunities to Give:
Heart of Missouri United Way is currently raising pledges in its Community Campaign (through Dec. 31) to support its 2013 work. A goal of $4 million has been set for meeting the ever-increasing needs of people in poverty, especially children.
Donations are accepted year-round at www.uwheartmo.org or by mail at the above address.


Job Point
2116 Nelwood Drive, Suite 200
Columbia, MO 65202
573-474-8560
www.jobpointmo.org
Founded: 1965
Who’s in charge? President Jim Loveless brings 32 years of leadership experience from the Missouri Department of Conservation, as well as service as a Columbia City Council member and an adjunct faculty appointment at Columbia College.
What population is served and how? Job Point’s mission is to promote the abilities of individuals seeking employment and greater participation in community life. Job Point meets this mission through providing career planning, skills training and job placement assistance for the community’s most disenfranchised individuals.
Why does Columbia need this organization? “The ongoing economic crisis continues to create a very tight environment for job applicants,” explains Brenda Overkamp, director of marketing and research. “Most of the individuals who come to Job Point for assistance have few marketable skills. Many are entwined in generational poverty with familial role models relying on public assistance.”
What is Job Point’s impact? In fiscal year 2012, Job Point helped 694 individuals take steps toward entering the workforce and becoming productive, tax-paying citizens. “Our efforts not only break the cycle of poverty but also help drive our local economy,” Overkamp says. “What better scenario for investment than reducing government reliance while increasing taxes paid?”
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $2,593,648
Total Expenses: $2,861,993
Total Revenue: $2,728,829
Program expenses are 91 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendars: 2013 Events
February: Awards Banquet highlights the heartwarming stories of amazing individuals who have overcome significant barriers to employment.
April: Comedy Night, a community favorite held in partnership with Assistance League of Mid-Missouri showcases comedic talent of area businesspeople in addition to a professional comic.
October: Local Celebrity Apprentice contest features 16 fearless individuals competing in three entertaining challenges.
Opportunities to Give:
Sponsor one of the upcoming events.
Provide a scholarship for office technology, certified nursing assistant or construction trades training.
Give an unrestricted contribution.
For more information, call 573-777-1506 or go to www.jobpointmo.org/donate.


March of Dimes Missouri Chapter, Central Division
308 E. High Street, #204
Jefferson City, MO 65101
573-353-9822
www.marchofdimes.com/missouri
Founded: The first March of Dimes walk in Columbia occurred on March 27, 1971.
Who’s in charge? Christy Carel is Central Division director.
What population is served and how? March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. More than 4 million babies were born in the United States last year, and March of Dimes helped each and every one of them though 75 years of research, education, vaccines and breakthroughs. It is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health.
What is the reach? The Central Division of the March of Dimes Missouri Chapter serves a 40-county area.
Why does Columbia need this organization? Every year, more than half a million babies are born too soon in the United States. Of the approximately 80,000 babies born each year in Missouri, almost 10,000 are born prematurely. Nearly 8 babies per 1,000 die before their first birthday in Missouri.
What is March for Dimes’ impact? The impact comes through research, community service and programs, education and advocacy. Specific examples include $3 million provided in grants to 13 Missouri researchers studying the causes and treatment of prematurity, birth defects and infant mortality; more than $140,000 awarded per year in Chapter Community Grants to Missouri organizations implementing programs to address prematurity; award-winning materials provided to hospitals, health clinics and community organizations to educate Missouri women on how to have a healthy pregnancy and healthy baby; and advocacy for the restoration of the state’s Newborn Screening Program budget.
Financial Information:
Program expenses are 82 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
May 5, 2013: March for Babies in Columbia. Individuals, family teams and corporate teams join forces to raise funds for babies.
September: Bikers for Babies is an annual charity motorcycle ride that attracts hundreds of bikers to raise money for babies, and features great entertainment and activities for families.
November: Signature Chefs Auction features central Missouri’s leading chefs offering their “signature” dishes to diners, while attendees also have the chance to purchase great dining and entertainment experiences in live and silent auctions.
Opportunities to Give:
Planned giving, including bequests, annuities or other planned giving vehicles. Individuals who include March of Dimes in their estate plans become members of the Victory Society.
Vehicle donations, including cars, boats and other vehicles. Call 888-898-1144 or go to www.marchofdimes.com/howtohelp.
Annual Giving: March of Dimes seeks annual gifts from individuals and corporations.
Donations taken online at www.marchofdimes.com/missouri or by phone at 314-513-9990.


Rainbow House
1611 Towne Drive
Columbia, MO 65202
573-474-6600
www.rainbowhousecolumbia.org
Founded: 1986
Who’s in charge? Executive Director Jan Stock is a licensed professional counselor, forensic interviewer and family court mediator with a master of arts degree in educational and counseling psychology from the University of Missouri.
What population is served and how? The mission at Rainbow House is to keep children safe and support families in crisis through prevention, assessment and intervention in child abuse and neglect. The Children’s Emergency Shelter accepts children taken into the state’s custody while they await placement in foster homes. Rainbow House also accepts referrals from parents or guardians in crisis who need a safe, temporary place for their children. The Child Advocacy Center serves children during investigations of sexual and severe physical abuse cases, as well as when the child has witnessed a serious criminal offense. Rainbow House also offers the only Homeless Youth Program between Kansas City, St. Louis and Springfield.
Why does Columbia need this organization? Rainbow House programs are unique in the central Missouri area in providing emergency shelter to children and youth who would have no other safe place to go.
What is Rainbow House’s impact? In 2011, 16 foster children and 53 crisis-care children were provided 1,307 safe nights at Rainbow House; the Child Advocacy Center provided 443 forensic interviews and 25 sexual abuse forensic exams; and the Homeless Youth Program served 42 youths with shelter or transitional living and support services. Along with meeting the immediate need of a safe shelter for newborns to 21-year-olds, Rainbow House also impacts the future of teens in the Homeless Youth Program through a variety of services including counseling, life skills training, case management and well-check exams.
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $811,069
Total Expenses: $1,141,708
Total Revenue: $1,141,708
Program expenses are 71percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
April: Pinwheels for Prevention, rainbow pinwheels distributed around town in honor of Child Abuse Prevention Month
April 13, 2013: 5th Annual Masquerade Ball, Rainbow House’s principal fundraising event
April 27, 2013: Kids Spring Fair, a free event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Flat Branch Park that includes games, prizes, face painting and bounce houses.
August 5, 2013: Rainbow House Golf Classic with the Pros, an annual tradition since 1991
November: Events to observe Homeless Youth Awareness Month
November & December: Holiday Drives, a collaborative effort to fill the needs of children who have been abused and neglected, and families in crisis
Opportunities to Give:
Give online at www. rainbowhousecolumbia.org.
Mail checks to the above address.
Host a third-party event to raise awareness and support. Call Chad McMinn at 573-474-6600, ext. 2115.


Voluntary Action Center
403 A Vandiver Drive
Columbia, MO 65202
573-874-2273
www.vacmo.org
Founded: 1969
Who’s in charge? Nick Foster became executive director in 2011. He has a background in nonprofits, most recently with Habitat for Humanity in Morgan County, Ind.
What population is served and how? The Voluntary Action Center, or VAC, provides low-income people with services intended to “fill the gaps” when other resources fall short. VAC meets individuals one-on-one to determine needs and qualification for services, which range from vouchers for buying work uniforms to rental assistance to prevent homelessness. VAC also connects local agencies and volunteers with opportunities to respond to serious social problems and community issues.
Why does Columbia need this organization? Some 20 percent of this community’s population is at or below the poverty line, Foster reports, and many others are also struggling in the current economic downturn. “Many,” Foster says, “are finding themselves struggling for the first time.”
What is VAC’s impact? In 2011, VAC assisted 9,627 persons in 3,801 households with 44,163 units of service, including single-parent households (45 percent), households with disability (39 percent), new households/first-time clients (26 percent) and homeless households (12 percent).VAC provides vital safety net services related to health, employment, education and housing. VAC also maintains a comprehensive knowledge base of other available services in Boone County. This makes VAC an important provider of information and referral for families who need help negotiating the social-assistance landscape.
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $436,774
Total Expenses: $487,208
Total Revenue: $506,896
Program expenses are 90 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
Feb. 8, 2013: Trivia Night is a fun evening of great trivia, food and drink to raise funds for VAC.
May 21, 2012: Spring Into Action recognizes a few of the area’s outstanding volunteers and raises funds for VAC.
July: Christmas in July provides a Christmas-themed picnic for low-income families; increases awareness that there are needs all year long — not just during the holidays; and raises funds for VAC.
Opportunities to Give:
VAC gratefully accepts donations via the mail (see above address) or online at www.justgive.org (enter Voluntary Action Center in the search box and then add “Columbia” in the advanced search).
In addition, VAC welcomes donations of cleaning, hygiene and laundry products; coats and blankets (new and gently used); diapers (sizes 4 and 5); fans (new and gently used); nonperishable food; and toilet paper.


Youth Empowerment Zone
204 E. Rogers St., Suite 101
Columbia, MO 65201
573-256-1896
www.yezweb.com
Founded: 2005
Who’s in charge? Executive Director Lorenzo Lawson is an award-winning community leader who has served on numerous not-for-profit boards; he is also a co-founder of the Columbia Silence the Violence movement.
What population is served and how? Youth Empowerment Zone, or YEZ, began to help at-risk Columbia youth obtain employment. Its mission is to connect at-risk youth with ideas and activities of empowerment and to provide them with the information, skills and networks that will help them transition successfully into adulthood. Youth receive training in education — GED support, college prep and career planning; employment — job readiness training, employment coaching and case management; empowerment — anger management, conflict resolution, financial education, case management, goal and action planning, mentoring and self-esteem building; and entrepreneurship — entrepreneur discovery, development and coaching.
Why does Columbia need this organization? Columbia leads Missouri in the high school drop-out rate, especially among black males, Lawson reports. In addition, Columbia youth face an unemployment rate of more than 25 percent.
What is Youth Empowerment Zone’s impact? YEZ served 235 youth during 2011. “YEZ changes the youth trajectory by empowering them with life skills they did not receive from their homes,” Lawson says. He adds that incarceration costs $25,000 per year, per youth, and 85 percent of incarcerated youth return to the community within five years, more bitter, less employable and more violent. “YEZ can take one-fifth of that $25,000 to help empower the youth … to become positive, tax-paying members of our community.”
Financial Information:
Program Expenses: $158,000
Total Expenses: $262,935
Total Revenue: $278,294
Program expenses are 60 percent of total expenses.
Mark Your Calendar: 2013 Events
May 24, 2013: Driving Youth to Success & Away from Violence is an annual fundraiser for which MFA Oil will donate 10 cents for every gallon of gas sold on that day at all 24 BreakTime stations in the Columbia area. Local celebrities will also pump gas and wash windows for tips to donate to YEZ.
Opportunities to Give:
Note: Missouri Youth Opportunity 50 percent tax credits are available for contributions to this organization. Mail donations to the above address or contact Karita Moss at 573-356-1896.


Access Arts
1724 McAlester St., Columbia, MO 65201
573-875-0275
www.schoolofservice.org
Founded: 1982
Program expenses are 72 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Dustin Hatcher, acting executive director
How it serves: The school has a broad mission of providing arts opportunities and education to underserved communities, including persons with disabilities. The motto is to make art available to anyone and everyone.
How many served past year: 4,600


Adult Day Connection
137 Clark Hall, Columbia, MO 65211
573-882-7070
www.adultdayconnection.com
Founded: 1989
Program expenses are 85 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Amy Byergo, executive director
How it serves: Older adults receive adult day services. Clients include those who have had a stroke or have Parkinson’s disease, dementia or other medical condition requiring nursing supervision. Meals, snacks, therapeutic exercise and recreational activities are provided.
How many served past year: 75 families


Alzheimer’s Association, Mid-Missouri Chapter
2400 Bluff Creek Drive, Columbia, MO 65201
573-443-8665
www.alz.org/mid-missouri
Year founded: 1985
Program expenses are 75 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Linda Newkirk, executive director
How it serves: The association provides care and support, a 24-Hour Helpline, support groups, advocacy, research and awareness to support people with Alzheimer’s or dementia, and their families and caregivers, in 29 counties throughout central and northeast Missouri. This area encompasses 56,000 plus people affected by the disease.
Number served annually: 12,000+


American Red Cross Heart of Missouri Chapter
Columbia Branch Office, 1805 W. Worley St., Columbia, MO 65203
573-445-9411
www.redcross.org
Founded: 1917
Program expenses are 91 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Dave Griffith, executive director
How it serves: The American Red Cross provides compassionate care to those in need through disaster relief; supporting America’s military families; lifesaving blood services; health and safety services; and international humanitarian work. The Heart of Missouri chapter covers 21 counties.
How many served past year: 11,755


Assistance League® of Mid Missouri
Upscale Resale Shop
1729 W. Broadway, Suite 1A, Columbia, MO 65203
573-445-4803 (shop)
573-445-3848 (office)
www.almm.org
Founded: 1994
Program expenses are 79 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Sue Finlay, president
How it serves: All proceeds from the Upscale Resale Shop go to support the Assistance League of Mid Missouri’s 10 philanthropic programs, which have goals ranging from providing grants to local teachers for enriching the classroom experience to supporting local victims of domestic abuse.
How many served past year: 4,000+ community members; 162 classrooms


Boone County Council on Aging
1123 Wilkes Blvd., Suite 100, Columbia, MO 65201
573-443-1111
www.booneaging.org
Founded: 1973
Program expenses are 89 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Jessica Macy, executive director
How it serves: Low-income people 55 and older receive volunteer and support services to help them live independently.
How many served past year: 1,221


Boys & Girls Club of Columbia
1200 N. Seventh St., Columbia, MO 65201
573-874-1697
www.bgc-columbia.org
Founded: 1997
Program expenses are 76 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Valorie Livingston, executive director
How it serves: At-risk youth receive afterschool programming and summer camp programming in five core program areas: character/leadership, education/career, health/life skills, art/music, and sports/recreation.
How many served past year: 300+


Boy Scouts of America, Great Rivers Council
1203 Fay Street, Columbia, MO 65201
573-449-2561
www.bsa-grc.org or www.friendsofscouting.org for online donations
Founded: 1910
Program expenses are 87 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Doug Callahan, scout executive
How it serves: For over a century, Boy Scouts has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun. The programs (Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venturing and Exploring) build character, train participants in the responsibilities of participating citizenship and develop personal fitness.
How many served past year: 10,000+ Scouts (youth) and Leaders across 33 counties


Camp Hickory Hill
P.O. Box 1942, Columbia, MO 65205
573-445-9146
www.camphickoryhill.com
Founded: 1976
Program expenses are 100 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Frank La Mantia, development director
How it serves: The camp’s mission is to teach children ages 7 to 13 who have juvenile diabetes how to manage and control their disease with help from their families and health providers. The camp is also a place where the campers find peer support.
How many served past year: 57 campers


Central Missouri Community Action
807 B North Providence, Columbia, MO 65203
573-443-8706
www.showmeaction.org or www.friendsofCMCA.org
Founded: 1965
Program expenses are 93 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Darin Preis, executive director
How it serves: The mission is to empower individuals and families in eight central Missouri counties to achieve self-reliance through programs ranging from small-business startup classes and microloans to Head Start.
How many served past year: 12,000


Child Care Aware of Missouri
1715 W. Worley St., Columbia, MO 65203
573-445-5437 or 800-243-9685
www.mo.childcareaware.org
Founded: 1999
Program expenses are 95 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Dr. L. Carol Scott, chief executive officer
How it serves: This agency assists families looking for child care and improves the quality of child care and before- and afterschool programs.
How many served past year: 31,200 families, children and child care professionals


City of Refuge
9030 Lake Meadows Way, Columbia, MO 65201
573-814-1170
www.cityofrefugecolumbia.com
Founded: 2010
Who’s in charge: Jen Wheeler, board president
How it serves: City of Refuge helps refugees and immigrants navigate a new life to become productive, successful, contributing members of our community. To support its mission, City of Refuge runs a cleaning business, Safi Sana.
How many helped past year: 2011


Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture
P.O. Box 1742, Columbia, MO 65205 (mailing)
1610 Paris Road, Columbia, MO 65201 (office)
1209 Smith St. Columbia, MO 65201 (urban farm)
573-514-4174
www.ColumbiaUrbanAg.org
Founded: 2009
Program expenses are 91 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Billy Polansky, general manager
How it serves: The Opportunity Garden program provides low-income families and schools with the resources to grow a personal backyard garden and a three-year mentorship program. The larger Columbia community is served through tours, educational programming, workshops, potlucks, farm and gardening volunteer opportunities, internships, environmental landscaping and public advocacy.
How many served past year: 2,000


Columbia Public Schools Foundation
P.O. Box 1234, Columbia, MO 65203
www.cpsf.org
Founded: 1996
Who’s in charge: Jill Cox, president
How it serves: The foundation awards annual grants to Columbia Public Schools students, faculty and staff for projects such as classroom technology, pilot math and literacy programs, and outdoor science projects. Only district-wide or cohort principal projects receive funding consideration.
How many served past year: Some 18,000 students and 2,600 employees in the Columbia Public Schools


Coyote Hill Christian Children’s Home
9501 Coyote Hill Road, Harrisburg, MO 65256
573-874-0179
www.coyotehill.org
Founded: 1991
Program expenses are 87 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Larry McDaniel, founder and executive director
How it serves: Abused and neglected children of mid-Missouri are provided a stable, safe place to live and grow.
How many served past year: 50


Family Counseling Center of Missouri Inc.
117 N. Garth Ave. Columbia, MO 65202
573-449-2581
www.fccmo.org
Founded: 1972
Program expenses are 85 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Karen Cade, executive director
How it serves: The center provides professional therapy, treatment, community support and educational services to anyone in mid-Missouri, charging a sliding-scale fee based upon household income.
How many served past year: 3,800


First Chance For Children
1010 Fay St., Columbia, MO 65201
575-777-1815 ext. 206
www.firstchanceforchildren.org
Founded: 2003
Program expenses are 85 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Jack Jensen, executive director
How it serves: Families in need with children birth to 3 years of age receive intensive services that support and strengthen families’ ability to raise happy healthy children.
How many served past year: 150 families through PAT+ program; 200+ safe cribs delivered; and 125+ families use the Lend and Learn Libraries.


First Night Columbia Inc.
P.O. Box 1284, Columbia, MO 65205
573-874-7460
www.firstnightcolumbia.org
Founded: 1994
Who’s in charge: Jane Accurso, director
How it serves: First Night produces an annual New Year’s Eve festival that celebrates the arts and promotes community togetherness in a healthy, safe and fun environment that is alcohol-free.
How many served past year: 8,000 to 10,000, depending on the weather


For His Glory Inc.
P.O. Box 30843
Columbia, MO 65205
573-673-4087
www.forhisgloryinc.com
Founded: 2000
Program expenses are 97 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Erika Buford, executive director
How it serves: At-risk youth and their families receive academic support, mentoring — for the youths and their families — and cultural enrichment programs.
How many served past year: 41 youth


Fun City Youth Academy
318 Park Ave., Columbia, MO 65201 (office)
P. O. Box 1426, Columbia, MO 65205 (mailing)
573-256-1436
www:funcityyouthacademy.org
Founded: 1972
Program expenses are 88 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Carolyn Micklem, director; Consuela Johnson, Saturday Program
How it serves: The academy offers low-income students — many of whom are behind grade level in reading or math — a Saturday and a Summer Academy providing reading and math instruction, as well as a variety of hands-on learning activities in science, African-American history and culture, and a program to teach civic awareness and entrepreneurial skills.
;125 children, 45 parents


Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland
230 Metro Drive, Jefferson City, MO 65109
877-312-4764
www.girlscoutsmoheartland.org
Founded: 2008
Program expenses are 86 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Anne Soots, chief executive officer
How it serves: Girls K–12 receive the premier leadership experience for girls. Girl Scouts programs build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place
How many served past year: 16,000 girls in 68 counties


Great Circle, Columbia Campus
(formerly Boys & Girls Town of Missouri)
4304 S. Bearfield Road, Columbia, MO 65201
573-874-8608
www.great-circle.org
Founded: 2001
Program expenses are 90 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Vince Hillyer, president & CEO
How it serves: Great Circle provides behavioral health services for children and families dealing with abuse and neglect, family trauma, educational delays and challenges such as depression and other mental health issues. Services include foster care case management, behavioral health in residential settings, parenting skills and in-home crisis prevention.
How many served past year: 10,520 children and family members statewide


Heart of Missouri Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)
607 E. Ash St., Columbia, MO 65201 (office)
P.O. Box 10028, Columbia, MO 65205 (mailing)
573-442-4670
www.heartofmissouricasa.com
Founded: 2005
Program expenses are 85 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Kelly Hill, acting program coordinator
How it serves: CASA serves abused and neglected children of all ages in the Boone and Callaway Family Court system by recruiting, training and supporting exceptional volunteers who provide a voice for these children and promote their best interests to the Family Court judge. Having a CASA volunteer helps ensure children do not languish in an inappropriate group or foster home but rather thrive in the safe embrace of a loving, safe and permanent home.
How many served past year: 88 children


Heart of Missouri Girls on the Run
P.O. Box 621 Columbia, MO 65205
573-268-3349
wwww.heartofmissourigirlsontherun.org
Founded: 2011
Who’s in charge: Nancy Yaeger, council director
How it serves: This afterschool program for girls in grades third through fifth grades inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum that creatively integrates running. The skills girls learn help prepare them for success in junior high.
Program expenses are 70 percent of total expenses.
How many served past year: 150


The Intersection
7 E. Sexton Road, Columbia, MO 65203
573-817-0089
www.intersectionmissouri.com
Founded: 2003
Program expenses are 89 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Kevin Czaicki, board chairman, and Dana Battison, executive director
How it serves: Low-income children from 5 to 17 years old are provided with free afterschool programming that includes tutoring, supplemental math skill development, social decision-making and problem-solving training, health education, a hot, nutritious meal each day, recreational activities, and artistic expression opportunities and character education.
How many served past year: 184 students


Love In the Name of Christ of Columbia (or Love INC)
1516 Business Loop 70 W., Columbia, MO 65202
573-256-7662
www.columbialoveinc.org
Founded: 2008
Program expenses are 85 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Pat McMurry, president
How it serves: Love INC operates a telephone clearinghouse built on a partnership network of local churches as a central point of contact to receive and assess requests from individuals and families in need. Although financial need is often the presenting problem, Love INC also attempts to address underlying issues such as employment, education and personal concerns.
How many served past year: 1,736 adults and children


Lutheran Family & Children’s Services, Mid-Missouri Office
401 West Blvd. N., Columbia, MO 65203
www.lfcsmo.org
573-815-9955
Founded: 1995
Program expenses are 89 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Christine Corcoran, director of regional operations
How it serves: The Columbia office offers birth parent counseling, foster care and adoption services to residents in 52 mid-Missouri counties, regardless of race, faith, national origin, gender or age.
How many served past year: 122 teen clients; 85 adoptive families; 111 days to children in
foster care; 6 infants placed with their forever families


Mid-Missouri Affiliate of Susan G. Komen
3301 W. Broadway, Suite C , Columbia, MO 65203
573-445-1905
www.komenmidmissouri.org
Founded: 2006
Program expenses are about 80 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Kathryn Adams, executive director
How it serves: Underserved and uninsured women and men in a 16-county area receive breast health education, screening and treatment. Through a grant process, Komen Mid-Missouri grants funds to organizations that provide the direct services.
How many served past year: 85,700 people were educated, screened or received treatment services in mid-Missouri.


Mary Lee Johnston Community Learning Center
1509 Hinkson Ave., Columbia, MO 65201
573-449-5600
www.mljclc.org
Founded: 1934
Who’s in charge: Meg Bartlett, executive director
How it serves: Children from 6 weeks to 6 years receive care in a childhood educational setting. While the center is open to all, approximately 75 percent of those enrolled are from families with low incomes, and care is provided on a sliding-scale-fee basis. The center also provides a nutritional program patterned off the Buddy Pack Program.
How many served past year: 88 children


Mid-Missouri Legal Services Corp.
205 E. Forest Ave., Columbia, MO 65203
573-442-0116
www.mmls.org
Year Founded: 1977
Program expenses are 86 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Susan K. Lutton, executive director
How it serves: Low-income residents of 11 mid-Missouri counties receive free legal services in civil cases including domestic violence; housing (landlord/tenant and foreclosure cases); family law; public benefits; health issues; consumer law (consumer debt and bankruptcy); elder law and guardianships.
How many served past year: 4,500


Missouri Contemporary Ballet
110 Orr St., Suite 102, Columbia, MO 65201
573-219-7134
www.missouricontemporaryballet.com
Founded: 2006
Program expenses are 49 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Karen Mareck Grundy, artistic/executive director
How it serves: Missouri Contemporary Ballet serves the general population by producing and performing high-quality dance programming. It also provides educational outreach to elementary schools, retirement homes and different festivals, and the “Dance Outside the Box” program provides free dance classes to children from various organizations such as the Boys and Girls Club and Rainbow House.
How many served past year: 2,900


Missouri Symphony Society (MOSS)
P.O. Box 841, Columbia, MO 65205
573-875-0600
www.mosymphonysociety.org
Founded: 1970
Program expenses are 90 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Carole Sue DeLaite, president
How it serves: This arts organization is dedicated to enhancing and increasing the cultural awareness of classical music in the Columbia community by presenting high-caliber performances by professional musicians; encouraging and educating young performing artists; and preserving and utilizing the Missouri Theatre as a performing arts center.
How many served past year: 10,000+ audience; 160 conservatory students


Museum of Art and Archaeology
1 Pickard Hall (corner of University Avenue and South Ninth Street), Columbia, MO 65211
573-882-3591
maa.missouri.edu
Year founded: 1957
Program expenses are 66 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Alex Barker, director
How it serves: As the art museum of the University of Missouri-Columbia, this museum serves University of Missouri faculty, staff and students, as well as the greater mid-Missouri area and visitors to Columbia.
How many served past year: 25,000+


Nora Stewart Early Learning Center
505 E. Ash St., Columbia, MO 65203
573-449-5981
www.norastewart.com
Founded: 1933
Program expenses are 80 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Cheryl Howard, executive director
How it serves: A diverse population of children receive loving, nurturing, educational care at an affordable price.
How many served past year: 75


OATS Inc.
2501 Maguire Blvd., Suite 101, Columbia, MO 65201
573-443-4516
www.oatsransit.org
Founded: 1971
Program expenses are 84 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Dorothy Yeager, executive director
How it serves: OATS Inc. provides specialized transportation for senior citizens, people with disabilities and the rural general public. The organization has a staff of more than 750 employees and a fleet of 800 vehicles statewide. OATS home office is in Columbia with seven regional offices throughout the state.
How many served past year: 37,000


PedNet Coalition Inc.
501 Fay St., Suite 204, Columbia, MO 65201
573-999-9894
www.pednet.org
Founded: 2000
Program expenses are 80 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Ian Thomas, executive director
How it serves: The mission is to encourage active travel such as walking, bicycling and rolling a wheelchair, and to promote the creation of safe and attractive network of paths, trails and multimodal streets that provide health, environmental, quality-of-life and economic benefits to the community. Activities include Walking School Bus, CoMET (Columbians for Modern Efficient Transit) and advocacy efforts to meet strategic planning objectives.
How many served past year: The populations of Columbia and Boone County


Phoenix Programs Inc.
90 E. Leslie Lane, Columbia, MO 65202
573-875-8880
www.phoenixprogramsinc.org
Founded: 1974
Program expenses are 83 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Deborah L. Beste, executive director
How it serves: This agency’s services included substance use detoxification, primary recovery, relapse prevention, court assistance programs, family education and day treatment, with residential services for men and outpatient treatment for men, women, youth and families, as well as integrated mental health and tobacco cessation treatment, supportive housing, and veterans housing.
How many served past year: 1,775


The Salvation Army
1108 W. Ash St., Columbia, MO 65203
573-442-3229
www.tsacentralmissouri.org
Founded: 1865
Program expenses are 87 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Major Richard Trimmell, regional coordinator
How it serves: Men, women, families, children, veterans and seniors are served through a homeless shelter, Harbor House and other programs such as emergency clothing and food pantry, youth character building program and holiday assistance.
How many served past year: 3,000+


Second Chance
P.O. Box 10186, Columbia 65205
660-882-5050
www.columbia2ndchance.org
Founded: 1985
Who’s in charge: Valerie Chaffin, executive director
How it serves: This organization provides dogs and cats homes through adoption and fostering programs.
How many served past year: 600 animals


Services for Independent Living
1401 Hathman Place Columbia, MO 65201
573-874-1646
www.silcolumbia.org
Founded: 1980
Who’s in charge: Aimee Wehmeier, executive director
Program expenses are 89 percent of total expenses.
How it serves: People with disabilities receive support to maximize their independence. Specific helps include transportation, peer group counseling, advocacy, assisted technology support and consumer-directed services.
How many served past year: 5,065


Tiger Scholarship Fund
One Champions Drive, Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65211
573-882-0704
www.tsf-mizzou.com
Who’s in charge: Sarah Baumgartner, associate athletics director of development
How it serves: The Tiger Scholarship Fund provides scholarship support (room, board, books, tuition, life skills, academic support) for the University of Missouri’s student-athletes and generates private funding for endowments, capital projects and other needs as prioritized by the MU Athletic Department. The annual fund is driven by donations for donor seating and parking for football and basketball.
How many served past year: 520 student-athletes


True North of Columbia
P.O. Box 1367 Columbia, MO 65205
573-875-0503
www.truenorthofcolumbia.org
Founded: 1983
Program expenses are 83 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Barbara Hodges, executive director
How it serves: Victims of domestic and sexual violence receive immediate safety and shelter, counseling, safety planning, case management, court advocacy and referrals to other agencies. True North also provides community outreach prevention and education.
How many served past year: 776 with shelter and counseling; 6,000 with prevention and education


UCP Child Development Center
3804 Santiago Drive, Columbia Mo 65203
573-449-6783
www.ucpheartland.org
Founded: 1999
Who’s in charge: Rick Forkosh, chief executive officer, and Christy Brookins, site director
How it serves: Children from a variety of socioeconomic, ethnic and cultural backgrounds with varying abilities receive high-quality, state-of-the-art early care and education at costs that are affordable to families in need.
How many served past year: 50


University YMCA
2500 MU Student Center, Columbia, MO 65211
573-882-1550
uymca.students.missouri.edu
Founded: 1890
Program expenses are 75 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Julie Alexander, executive director
How it serves: Programs include Kid Contact and Y Tutors, in which University of Missouri student volunteers mentor children in Columbia’s 1st Ward, and Camp Mudd, a nine-week summer camp that serves Columbia children (scholarships available for children in need). University YMCA also sponsors the Campus Chapter of Habitat for Humanity.
How many served past year: 400 youth


Vitae Foundation
1731 Southridge Drive, Suite D, Jefferson City, MO 65109
573-634-4316 or 800-393-5791
www.vitaefoundation.org, www.youroptions.com, www.gravityteen.com
Founded: 1974
Program expenses are 60 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Carl Landwehr, president
How it serves: Vitae makes a difference in the lives of young women who are faced with an unplanned pregnancy. Using mass media venues such as TV, radio, Internet, and mobile phones, Vitae’s research-based educational messaging helps inform these women about local resources available to assist them in making an informed decision.
How many served past year: 4,600 through events; 161,991 through websites


Women’s HealthCare Alliance Inc.
711 W. Broadway, Columbia, MO 65203
573-449-6644
www.FranklySpeakingOnline.com
Founded: 2008
Program expenses are 92 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: Melody Parry, president
How it serves: The mission of Women’s HealthCare Alliance is to inspire, encourage and inform women to take control of their health needs. Activities include a spring and a fall Speaking of Women’s Health event to educate mid-Missouri women on their health and well-being, as well as a Tween Talk program for parents and “tween” girls between the ages of 9 and 12. E-newsletters and social media keep women engaged throughout the year.
How many served past year: 1,000 women at conferences; 5,000 women through digital newsletters.


Woodhaven
1405 Hathman Place, Columbia, MO 65201
573-876-7327
www.woodhaventeam.org
Founded: 1964
Program expenses are 88 percent of total expenses.
Who’s in charge: C. Mark Palmer, chief executive officer
How it serves: Woodhaven helps individuals with developmental disabilities live independently in the community while building skills and relationships through activities and volunteerism.
How many served past year: 116

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